Written by 6:43 am Source News Views: 0

South Korean scientists' outcry over planned R&D budget cuts – Nature.com

Click to share the News

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.
Advertisement
Sara Reardon is a freelance journalist based in Bozeman, Montana.
You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar
South Korea’s scientists have been left reeling after the government proposed substantial cuts to the 2024 federal research budget. Government spending on research and development in the country has been among the highest in the world, as a proportion of gross domestic product (GDP), and the announcement has sparked a rare outcry from researchers.

Access Nature and 54 other Nature Portfolio journals
Get Nature+, our best-value online-access subscription
$29.99 / 30 days
cancel any time

Subscribe to this journal
Receive 51 print issues and online access
$199.00 per year
only $3.90 per issue

Rent or buy this article
Prices vary by article type
from$1.95
to$39.95

Prices may be subject to local taxes which are calculated during checkout
Nature 622, 224-225 (2023)
doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-023-02841-w
Reprints and Permissions
Israel edges out South Korea for top spot in research investment
Why South Korea is the world’s biggest investor in research
The science stars of East Asia
Five hubs of Asian science
Science in East Asia — by the numbers
Japanese research is no longer world class — here’s why
News
Scientists in diaspora are a powerful resource for their home countries
World View
China’s Belt and Road Initiative is boosting science — the West must engage, not withdraw
Editorial
How to rebuild trust in science: NIH director nominee fields questions
News
Argentina election: front runner vows to slash science funding
News
Polar researchers strive for progress despite adverse world events
Nature Index
Japanese research is no longer world class — here’s why
News
Scientists in diaspora are a powerful resource for their home countries
World View
Gordon Conway (1938–2023), leader in sustainable development
Obituary
Seeking talents around the world.
Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
Guangzhou Medical University
Reference #: C – 230920     Assistant or Associate Professor (Research) Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences – Department of Surgery, Division o…
Montréal, Quebec (CA)
McGill University – Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences – Department of Surgery
What are we looking for? One way in which cells adapt diverse functional responses is through context-dependent interactions with their microenvironme
1305 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065
Weill Cornell Medical College-Department of Physiology and Biophysics
We are recruiting scientists that are working to develop the next generation of RNA and DNA-based therapies and vaccines.
New York City, New York (US)
ICAHN GENOMICS INSTITUTE
Nankai University welcomes global outstanding talents to join for common development.
Tianjin (Province), China
Nankai University

Israel edges out South Korea for top spot in research investment
Why South Korea is the world’s biggest investor in research
The science stars of East Asia
Five hubs of Asian science
Science in East Asia — by the numbers
An essential round-up of science news, opinion and analysis, delivered to your inbox every weekday.
Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter — what matters in science, free to your inbox daily.
Nature (Nature) ISSN 1476-4687 (online) ISSN 0028-0836 (print)
© 2023 Springer Nature Limited

source

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)
Close